Wildcat Safety Stand Down: Kansas State Polytechnic hosts aviation safety practices event March 31

WildcatSafetyStandDownBy Julee Cobb

From advice on mastering an aircraft to insight into upset recovery, the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus will be hosting an aviation seminar focused on strengthening flight safety within the industry.

Wildcat Safety Stand Down will be 4-8:30 p.m. Friday, March 31, in the College Center Conference Room at Kansas State Polytechnic and will feature presentations from four industry experts with a variety of backgrounds and proficiencies. Initiated by the campus’s nationally recognized flight team, this half-day seminar is designed for aviation professionals and general aviation enthusiasts to gain enhanced awareness and knowledge of safety practices while networking with each other and learning more about the aviation program at Kansas State Polytechnic.

“One of the flight team’s goals is to contribute to the growth and advancement of the aviation industry,” said Matthew Katzke, Waukesha, Wisconsin, a senior in professional pilot and flight team secretary/treasurer. “For many years, we have been able to share our knowledge of and enthusiasm for flying with the younger generation through summer programs, and now we want to expand our reach and connect with adults and professionals in the industry. We really hope this will be a helpful event that strengthens safety within the aviation community.”

During Wildcat Safety Stand Down, participants will experience four safety sessions covering a variety of different areas: Tom Turner, executive director of the Air Safety Foundation at the American Bonanza Society will present on mastering your aircraft; Seth Short, an aviator in the U.S. Navy and 2005 alumnus of Kansas State Polytechnic’s professional pilot program, will speak about safety culture in the military; John “Dusty” Dowd, owner of Syracuse Flying Service and an air race pilot, will discuss safety from an agricultural and air race perspective; and Troy Brockway, professor of aviation at Kansas State Polytechnic, will present on implementing a safety management system in a collegiate or training environment and upset recovery.

To continue reading, click HERE.

Kansas State Polytechnic to highlight programs, campus clubs and student accomplishments at Open House on April 1

OpenHouseBannerFrom flight demonstrations and fleet tours to computer coding activities and 3D-printing fun, the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus will be showcasing all of its program offerings and technologies during annual Open House on April 1.

From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Kansas State Polytechnic will open its campus to the community and beyond to give visitors an inside look at academics, the facilities and student projects, clubs and achievements. Just like the campus’ “polytechnic” way of teaching and learning, many of the booths will be hands-on, encouraging attendees to participate in various activities and games. There also will be snacks, giveaways and an appearance by Willie the Wildcat. Below are examples of what guests can expect to experience at Open House:

  • Flight Team Pancake Breakfast – Start your Open House experience off right with a pancake feed from 7 to 10 a.m. courtesy of the Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team. The meal is by donation only and there will be a drawing for two K-State football tickets with reserved parking.
  • Aviation Expo – See the aviation program’s fleet up close during a tour of the more than 30 aircraft.
  • Computer Systems Handson Experience – Check out the computer systems technology program during a basic coding activity and take photos in front of the green screen.
  • UAS Simulation and Flight – Experience a demonstration of industry-quality UAS software from our nationally recognized faculty and watch as an unmanned aircraft takes flight.
  • Build it. Print it. – Tour through our mechanical engineering technology lab and see firsthand the wonders of 3D printing.

Additionally, Open House is an opportunity for prospective students and their parents interested in enrollment to learn more about life on campus. Those curious about becoming a Wildcat can sign up for the VIP experience and receive a campus tour, attend an alumni panel and lunch, and gain insight into financial aid and scholarships. Registration is free and can be found HERE. General questions about attending Kansas State Polytechnic can be directed to the office of admissions at 785-826-2640 or polytechnic@k-state.edu.

For a listing of all of the events happening at this year’s Open House, click HERE.

 

Kansas State Polytechnic’s Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to explore First Amendment rights

By Julee Cobb

Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead a presentation on "Free Speech in Times of Crisis" at the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus on Feb. 16.

Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead a presentation on “Free Speech in Times of Crisis” at the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus on Feb. 16.

In a time where the legitimacy of news and journalism is being challenged and freedom of speech as a whole has taken center stage in the public eye, Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus will explore the principles of the country’s First Amendment in its latest Civic Luncheon Lecture Series.

“Free Speech in Times of Crisis” will be presented at noon Thursday, Feb. 16, at Kansas State Polytechnic’s College Center conference room. Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead the discussion. Bob Protzman, general manager of Rocking M Media, will act as the moderator.

The First Amendment grants U.S. citizens the right to express their opinions, including times when society is under stress. This presentation will look at the reasons free speech is protected and provide current examples of how it’s being questioned. Wolgast, who previously worked in newspaper journalism for 19 years, including nine years as an editor at The New York Times, also will cover the topics of news bias and the popularity of the term “fake news.”

“One of the jobs the press has is to hold a mirror to society,” Wolgast said. “That’s why we have to report on the failings of government and institutions, even if it upsets the powers that be. If the press can motivate people to act when things aren’t going well, then by one measure the press has succeeded.”

The Civic Luncheon Lecture Series is free and the public is invited. Attendees are welcome to eat during the discussion, and can bring their own lunch or purchase a lunch at the K-State Café and then bring their tray into the conference room.

Greg Stephens, an associate professor of communication and business management at Kansas State Polytechnic, created the Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to provide the campus and the community with an opportunity to learn about and participate in various current events impacting local issues. This presentation, in particular, is made possible in part by the Kansas Humanities Council. For more information on the series, contact Stephens at 785-819-6887 or gregs@k-state.edu.

 

Terri Gaeddert joins Kansas State Polytechnic as director of academic operations

By Julee Cobb

Terri Gaeddert, former associate dean and director of teacher education at Sterling College, has been named the first-ever director of academic operations for the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus.

Terri Gaeddert, former associate dean and director of teacher education at Sterling College, has been named the first-ever director of academic operations for the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus.

With a continued focus on enhancing the student experience, Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus has hired its first-ever director of academic operations.

Terri Gaeddert, former associate dean and director of teacher education at Sterling College, has been selected for the new role and is charged specifically with strengthening program collaboration under the campus’ recently implemented School of Integrated Studies. She also will streamline course schedules, mentor faculty and improve faculty resourcing. The creation of the position, which Gaeddert began in January, is a part of Kansas State Polytechnic’s vision of providing an environment centered around experiential learning and cost-effective education.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Gaeddert as the inaugural director of academic operations on the Polytechnic Campus. Along with an indisputable passion for higher education, she brings years of valuable expertise and a fresh perspective that will help lead the School of Integrated Studies and our commitment to offering students relevant education with a strong experimental component,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic.

In fall 2016, the campus established the School of Integrated Studies after it was approved by the Kansas Board of Regents the year before. The new academic alignment allows programs and faculty to no longer be separated by department, but to be organized together under the director of academic operations. One of Gaeddert’s primary roles is to help faculty utilize the collective structure to generate synergy among the programs — integrating different disciplines so students will receive additional skills and knowledge relatable to their majors.

Gaeddert also will develop a two-year rotation of courses, ensuring every course in a major is offered at least once within a two-year window. This will provide all students — bachelor’s degree-seeking students, transfer students and students with an associate degree pursing a bachelor’s degree — the opportunity to complete their endeavors in a timely manner, which will bolster cost savings. In addition, Gaeddert will implement scheduling efficiencies for faculty so they can spend more time with students, performing research and connecting with the community.

“My teaching philosophy is based around the three R’s: relationships, relevance and rigor. One of the reasons this position stood out is because the polytechnic, or hands-on, approach this campus values encompasses those elements,” said Gaeddert. “Knowledge and understanding is only the beginning; it’s those that are able to apply, do and create using their knowledge that will be heavily sought after. I look forward to working with the faculty at Kanas State Polytechnic as they continue to cultivate an experience-driven atmosphere for their students.”

A native of Ogallala, Nebraska, Gaeddert has a doctorate in educational leadership from Wichita State University, a master’s in teaching from Friends University in Wichita and a bachelor’s in mathematics and computer science from Chadron State College in Chadron, Nebraska. Most recently, she served as the associate dean of Sterling College as well as its director of teacher education for four years. Gaeddert also worked in high schools as a teacher and technology specialist, wrote curriculum and problem-solving tests for the Kansas State Education Department, and has served on a number of Kansas teacher education committees.

Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program provides tips on safe operations for drone hobbyists

By Julee Cobb

With unmanned aircraft, or drones, a popular gift item this holiday season and beyond, the unmanned aircraft systems program on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus has five essential tips to help hobbyists fly safely.

Started almost 10 years ago, the Kansas State Polytechnic UAS program has made safe operations the cornerstone of its classroom curriculum, research and flight instruction. And with the Federal Aviation Administration estimating the number of small unmanned aircraft purchased by hobbyists in 2016 to reach 1.9 million, Kansas State Polytechnic wants to provide beginner pilots with the important basics of proper use and safety.

Spencer Schrader, a student in the UAS program and a flight instructor, says safe operations are a necessary focus for every unmanned pilot, from hobbyist to student to professional, because the industry is still developing, which means untested technology and ever-evolving guidelines.

“The world of unmanned aircraft, or drones, is still relatively new and some standards in technology either haven’t been set yet or continue to mature,” Schrader said. “Following fundamental safety precautions can help mitigate deficiencies that could be encountered with the aircraft itself or during flight operations. Safety is a top priority in the UAS courses offered at Kansas State Polytechnic and we’re proud to be able to share this insight with hobbyists to make a positive impact on their flying experience.”

• The first rule for hobbyists to remember is the FAA requires them to register their aircraft. All drones that weigh between .55 pounds to 55 pounds — even those purchased for recreational use only — must be catalogued on registermyuas.faa.gov. It only costs $5 and takes about 10 minutes, which could save hundreds of dollars in fines.

• Next, the aircraft’s batteries should be fully charged before flying. This will not only give hobbyists the longest flights possible with their drone, but it will also prevent the battery’s charge from dropping below 20 percent. Unmanned aircraft carry lithium polymer batteries, which are a hazardous material, and flying below 20 percent could increase the volatility of the battery. If your aircraft has poor battery health, it could result in the termination of the flight mid-air, endangering your drone and anyone on the ground.

• Kansas State Polytechnic’s third tip is centered on avoiding an air-to-air collision. Hobbyists should never fly within five miles of an airport unless prior authorization has been obtained from both the control tower and the airport manager. Control towers are unable to spot a drone on their radar, so it is imperative that you notify them of the time, location and altitude of your flight.

• Hobbyists also should always maintain visual contact with the aircraft. The FAA requires hobby pilots to always have their drone in their sights when flying it. An object or manned aircraft could be in the flight path, and if you’re flying beyond your visual line of sight, it could put those in the air and on the ground in harm’s way.

• The final safety tip is to remove the propellers when powering the aircraft on indoors. For example, if you are working on the aircraft or conducting software updates while inside, it may require you to apply power to the aircraft. If you accidentally bump the throttle on the controller or transmitter, it may cause the propellers to begin spinning, putting yourself and anyone else in the room at risk of serious injury.

Kansas State Polytechnic’s “Top Five Tips for Drone Safety” can also be viewed in a video version, which is posted at the top of the story or found on YouTube: https://youtu.be/cRr4bgPh-OM.

Kansas State Polytechnic, which is recognized as having the No. 2 UAS program in the nation by Drone Training HQ, offers a bachelor’s degree with two focus areas — UAS flight and operations and UAS design and integration — as well as a UAS minor. Companies can attend professional development courses focused on multirotor and fixed-wing operations through the UAS program and become a certified remote pilot in command in the Part 107 course offering.

For more information about the UAS short courses, contact Travis Balthazor, flight operations manager at Kansas State Polytechnic, at 785-826-8557 or travisb@k-state.edu. For more information on the UAS bachelor’s degree, contact admissions at 785-826-2640 or polytechnic@k-state.edu.

Partners Kansas State Polytechnic, Westar Energy advance electric utility inspection and maintenance methods with drone technology

By Julee Cobb

The unmanned aircraft systems program on Kansas State University's Polytechnic Campus is working with industry partner Westar Energy to integrate drone technology into the electric utility industry.

The unmanned aircraft systems program on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is working with industry partner Westar Energy on integrating drone technology into the electric utility sector.

Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus and Kansas-based power company Westar Energy are propelling the electric utility industry forward by innovating inspection and maintenance methodologies with drone technology.

With a focus on increasing reliability for customers, improving employee safety and reducing costs, Kansas State Polytechnic’s unmanned aircraft systems program and Westar Energy have been collaborating over the past year to integrate unmanned aircraft into the power company’s services. The partners, whose relationship dates back to 2013, have been working to establish an in-house UAS team at Westar Energy as well as redefine inspection and maintenance techniques using unmanned aircraft — often referred to as drones — for transmission lines, power plant boilers and electrical substations.

“One of our program’s strategic objectives has been to help introduce UAS technology to the commercial market, and we are proud to have Westar Energy as a partner because this collaborative relationship is a win-win for both of our interests,” said Kurt Carraway, executive director of the UAS program on K-State’s Polytechnic Campus. “The opportunity to assist Westar Energy in building an organic UAS program from the ground up has been tremendously rewarding for us — we get to learn about the power industry while helping Westar Energy provide first-class service to its valuable customer base. We look forward to continuing this developmental work.”

Westar Energy has implemented this technology in the day-to-day inspection of thousands of miles of transmission lines and utility towers that run across Kansas. UAS platforms capture imagery of the structures to identify needed replacements and inspect completed repairs. The standard procedure for all power companies has been employees either using binoculars to examine the lines and towers, or riding lifts high into the air —which can be dangerous.

Staff members of Kansas State Polytechnic's UAS program fly a drone with a Westar Energy employee practicing new inspection techniques of transmission lines.

Staff members of Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program fly a drone with a Westar Energy employee practicing new inspection techniques of transmission lines.

Westar Energy has a team of employees who have completed multirotor and fixed-wing training at Kansas State Polytechnic and lead the power company’s internal UAS division. Together with Kansas State Polytechnic, 3-D mapping of substations and boiler inspections also have been explored. The Kansas State Polytechnic UAS program has assisted Westar Energy’s UAS program with developing and testing protocols, providing additional flight instruction and creating operational guides for these new areas with UAS technology.

“Our UAS program saves money for customers by making our operations more efficient and our work safer. It also makes our service more reliable,” said Jason Klenklen, supervisor of transmission maintenance for Westar Energy. “We can use UAS or drones to identify struggling equipment before it causes an outage. Drones also make it safer and faster to inspect lines in difficult-to-reach areas when crews are locating the cause of a power outage.”

With photogrammetry, Westar Energy can generate authentic images, 3-D maps and drawings with accurate measurements of their substations so maintenance in a specific area can be outlined ahead of time instead of in the field where space can be compact and precarious. Westar Energy employees have been trained how to set up an autonomous flight plan, which is necessary for the camera on the UAS platform to take photos based on either time or distance, as well as how to execute the mission to ensure quality data.

Kansas State Polytechnic and Westar Energy’s most recent exploration has been focused on using unmanned aircraft to inspect boilers. The use of UAS inside a boiler reduces risks to personnel while allowing assessments to be conducted in an efficient and timely manner.

“Incorporating UAS, or drones, into the inspection process of boilers adds an element of safety. It allows employees to view the internal components of the boiler through real time imagery captured by a drone while securely staying on the outside,” said Sam Sharp, a researcher in the Kansas State Polytechnic UAS Laboratory and Westar Energy’s primary liaison. “Because there are no lights inside the boiler and a GPS signal is not accessible, extensive training is needed to control the aircraft. This is one of the most valuable applications of a drone within the energy sector, so the lengthy training is worth it.”

the Smoky Hills UAS Pavilion

The Smoky Hill UAS Pavilion was built in part by Westar Energy and is housed on the Polytechnic Campus. It measures 300-feet-long by 200-feet-wide and is 50-feet-tall, providing a space for accessible flight training and research.

In October 2015, Westar Energy and Kansas State Polytechnic collaborated on opening one of the largest enclosed unmanned flight facilities in the nation. Built on the Polytechnic Campus, it measures 300-feet-long by 200-feet-wide and 50-feet-tall, and employs 25 wooden poles donated and installed by Westar Energy as well as custom fabricated netting panels on all sides and across the top. The structure, called the Smoky Hill UAS Pavilion, provides a space for accessible flight training and research for students, staff and faculty in addition to outside industries for company instruction and short courses.

Kansas State Polytechnic is recognized as having the No. 2 UAS program in the nation by Drone Training HQ. The program, which began almost 10 years ago, consists of a bachelor’s degree with two focus areas — UAS flight and operations and UAS design and integration — as well as a UAS minor, research and flight operations. Kansas State Polytechnic was the first entity in the United States to be awarded statewide access for unmanned flight operations by the FAA and is a member of the FAA Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aircraft Systems.

Westar Energy provides electricity to about 700,000 homes and businesses in the eastern third of Kansas. In early 2017, Westar will provide about half the electricity needs of its retail customers from emission-free sources.

To inquire about possible research collaborations between Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program and your company, contact Carraway at 785-826-2624 or kcarraway@ksu.edu. To learn more about Westar Energy’s UAS division or its general services, contact Klenklen at 785-575-8187.

Postdoctoral fellow joins staff at Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center

By Julee Cobb

Postdoctoral fellow Amit Gautam, who previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, is now a researcher for the Kanas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

Postdoctoral fellow Amit Gautam, who previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, is now a researcher for the Kanas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center is growing its staff with the addition of a postdoctoral fellow. Amit Gautam, who has previously worked in the sugar technology and water purification industries, has joined the center as a researcher in the areas of bulk solids storage and handling.

Gautam most recently was a chemical engineer with Aqua ReUse, a manufacturer of industrial wastewater purification equipment and filtration media in Mission, Texas. He was responsible for the design, development, trouble-shooting and debottlenecking of converting a batch system to a continuous system, as well as creating separation and purification strategies that decreased total suspended solids and removed heavy metals from wastewater.

Gautam also was employed by the Audubon Sugar Institute, a part of Louisiana State University in St. Gabriel, Louisiana, as a postdoctoral researcher. His duties included testing the process of milling sugar cane and extracting sugar juice from the cane to find appropriate ways of reducing cost and waste. He also explored using fibrous residue from sugar to create cellulosic ethanol and butanol.

“We are excited to add Dr. Gautam to the K-State bulk solids team,” said Kurt Barnhart, associate dean of research and engagement on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus. “He brings years of experience conducting research in this area and has already presented new ideas and opportunities to consider as we move the center forward and make it a recognized leader in bulk solids technology.”

At the center, Gautam is testing bulk solids — loose, dry commodities like minerals, chemicals, sugars, plastic resin, fillers, pellets or recycled plastics — to help clients understand the best way to store and handle their materials. He examines the physical characteristics of the bulk solids and how they behave under various conditions, such as humidity and hot and cold temperatures. He also puts them through both dense phase and dilute phase pneumatic conveying to determine which process works best as the bulk solids move through hoppers and storage equipment.

An expert in discrete element method, or DEM, Gautam additionally will create modeling of simulations. He plans to study the possible positive utilizations of dust explosions, teach short courses at the center and continue developing collaborations with other bulk solids institutes.

“Often times companies do no realize they are working with bulk solids, but these materials actually make up more than 80 percent of items transported around the world,” Gautam said. “I am proud to continue my research at the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center because any advancements we discover will have an impact on a multitude of industries.”

A native of Mumbai, India, Gautam received a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Mumbai. His master’s degree is focused in bioprocess technology from the Institute of Chemical Technology, also in Mumbai, and he has a doctorate in chemical and biological engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City. Gautam’s ultimate goal is to become a professor.

The Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center, in Salina, is a research, testing and educational facility dedicated to the science and understanding of bulk solids materials handling. The center is the only one of its kind in North America, housing six laboratories for university and industry-sponsored research; training, conference and lecture rooms; a material properties test lab; and a full-scale bulk solids test bay. The key tenant of the center is the university, while two local companies, Coperion K-Tron Salina and Vortex Valves, supplement the facility by serving as anchor occupants.

For more information on the facility’s research capabilities, contact John Lawrence, research director, at jlawren@k-state.edu, or Barnhart at 785-826-2972 or kurtb@k-state.edu.

Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team advances to nationals, senior Chris Messing wins Top Pilot

By Julee Cobb

Members of the traveling Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team pose with their awards from the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's SAFECON Region VI competition. Back row, from left: Jason Rohlf, Nicholas Terrapin, Scott Agee, faculty adviser Benjamin Jaffee, team captain Austin Bally, Caleb Strahm and Zachariah Smith; and front row, from left: Jacob Mitchell, Matthew Katzke, Maddie Perry, Chris Messing, Mason McMillan and Christopher Pennington.

Members of the traveling Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team pose with their awards from the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s SAFECON Region VI competition. Back row, from left: Jason Rohlf, Nicholas Terrapin, Scott Agee, faculty adviser Benjamin Jaffee, team captain Austin Bally, Caleb Strahm and Zachariah Smith; and front row, from left: Jacob Mitchell, Matthew Katzke, Maddie Perry, Chris Messing, Mason McMillan and Christopher Pennington.

The Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team has landed the honor of competing on a national stage after qualifying in regional play with a third-place finish as well as winning several individual awards.

Attending the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s SAFECON competition Oct. 17-20 in Norman, Oklahoma, the flight team — from Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus — battled it out against other colleges in its region for the chance to advance to the national championship. After participating in a variety of events consisting of tests both on the ground and in the air, the Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team placed third overall, securing its spot at nationals in May 2017.

“During the weeks leading up to regionals, the team spent many hours working on the intricacies of each event, and then during the competition, everyone did an excellent job of executing what they had learned,” said Austin Bally, Wichita, a senior in professional pilot and captain of the flight team. “Along with the third-place team finish, we earned several top 10 placings in the ground events and many top five scores in the flight events. Our success was a collaborative effort and proved that practice pays off.”

The Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team faced six other universities during the SAFECON regional: Oklahoma State University, which placed first; University of Nebraska, Omaha, which came in second; Southeastern Oklahoma State University; University of Central Missouri; St. Louis University, Parks College; and University of Oklahoma. Members of each team entered ground and flight events, such as landing a plane accurately in a designated area, recognizing different types of aircraft from ambiguous photos and attempting to hit a target while dropping an item from the air. Participants earned points for each event entered, which were then accumulated to score single event winners as well as the top three teams and the overall top pilot.

Chris Messing, a senior in the professional pilot program at Kansas State Polytechnic, wins the title of Top Pilot and is the Top Scoring Contestant at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association's SAFECON Region VI.

Chris Messing, a senior in the professional pilot program at Kansas State Polytechnic, wins the title of Top Pilot and is the Top Scoring Contestant at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s SAFECON Region VI.

One of the individual standout moments came from Kansas State Polytechnic senior Chris Messing, Wichita, who, because of his placings in seven events, accrued enough points to win both Top Scoring Contestant and the Top Pilot award out of more than 80 total participants from the seven universities. Messing, who enjoys the family atmosphere, networking and the continued opportunity to develop his aviation knowledge, says earning the principal honors was unexpected, but it has given him validation and confidence.

“Going into the competition, I just wanted to do my best so I could give my teammates the opportunity to experience nationals,” Messing said. “I’m proud to win these awards because they demonstrate that my hard work and preparation for the competition have been worth it. They also give me more confidence to know I can accomplish anything as long as I study, stay focused and do what’s right.”

Along with Messing, the following members of the Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team competed at regionals; included are individual placings:

Nicholas Terrapin, junior, Alma, first in message drop, fifth in navigation, 22nd in aircraft recognition and 22nd in power-off landing; Mason McMillan, senior, Ozawkie, eighth in power-off landing, 10th in aircraft preflight inspection, 22nd in short field landing and 22nd in simulated comprehensive aircraft navigation; Caleb Strahm, freshman, Sabetha, 25th in computer accuracy; Austin Bally, senior, Wichita, second in power-off landing, fifth in navigation, 11th in computer accuracy, 14th in simulated comprehensive aircraft navigation and 16th in short field landing; and Maddie Perry, sophomore, Wichita, 15th in short field landing and 34th in computer accuracy.

Jacob Mitchell, junior, Foxfield, Colorado, eighth in navigation,ninth in aircraft preflight inspection, 10th in power-off landing and 22nd in computer accuracy; Jason Rohlf, freshman, Tipton, Iowa, second in aircraft recognition; Scott Agee, senior, Independence, Missouri, first in message drop, sixth in ground trainer, 13th in navigation, 24th in short field landing and 26th in simulated comprehensive aircraft navigation; Zachariah Smith, freshman, Hendersonville, North Carolina, 28th in aircraft recognition; Christopher Pennington, senior, El Paso, Texas, first in aircraft recognition; and Matthew Katzke, junior, Waukesha, Wisconsin, eighth in navigation, 21st in simulated comprehensive aircraft navigation and 23rd in computer accuracy.

The flight team has 20 members, with 12 on the travel team after a tryout process. Along with competing annually, flight team members also use their club as way to give back to the community and to connect children with aviation. Throughout the year the team is a part of several events like the All-University Open House and Candy Canes and Airplanes. It also conducts two aviation camps for kids and one for high school students in the summer.

In 2014, the flight team won the Loening Trophy at nationals, which is considered the oldest and most elite of all collegiate aviation awards. It recognized the team as having the most outstanding all-around aviation program in the country.

For more information on the flight team, including sponsorship, contact faculty adviser Benjamin Jaffee at 785-826-2978 or bjaffee@k-state.edu.

Kansas State Polytechnic expands learning fleet with four new Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft

By Julee Cobb

The aviation program at Kansas State University's Polytechnic Campus is expanding its learning fleet with the addition of four new Beechcraft Bonanza G36 aircraft.

The aviation program at Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is expanding its learning fleet with the addition of four new Beechcraft Bonanza G36 aircraft.

The aviation program at Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is enhancing its students’ flying experience with the addition of new aircraft to its fleet.

Kansas State Polytechnic has purchased a quartet of Beechcraft Bonanza G36 aircraft from longtime university partner Textron Aviation as part of its plan to continuously provide professional pilot majors with the most relevant and cutting-edge flight training possible. The new planes arrived intermittently throughout 2015 and 2016, with the final delivery in mid-October. Kansas State Polytechnic’s aviation program is now outfitted with 34 learning aircraft, all of which are Textron Aviation products.

“For more than 50 years, this campus has been offering innovative aviation education and it is important that we continue that rich tradition with an investment in our students’ future,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic. “We are proud to add the Bonanza G36 to our fleet family because its state-of-the-art technology and amenities are exactly what students will experience professionally, preparing them for a successful transition from college to career.”

“Kansas State Polytechnic continues to be a strong partner for Textron Aviation and we are thrilled they have selected Textron Aviation products to modernize their flight training fleet,” said Doug May, vice president, Piston Aircraft. “The Beechcraft Bonanza will provide the students a modern and sophisticated training platform to advance their skills. We are excited to continue building our relationship with the university to support the next generation of aviators.”

Doug May, vice president of Piston Aircraft at Textron Aviation, officially presents Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic, with the keys to the aviation program's fourth Beechcraft Bonanza G36 aircraft.

Doug May, vice president of Piston Aircraft at Textron Aviation, officially presents Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic, with the keys to the aviation program’s fourth Beechcraft Bonanza G36 aircraft.

The Bonanza G36 aircraft, which are being used primarily in the aviation program for commercial and certified flight instructor, or CFI, ratings, feature a Garmin G1000 avionics system that aids situational awareness, simplicity and safety in the cockpit. They also are equipped with the satellite-based surveillance system ADS-B, which broadcasts an airplane’s location to air traffic control as well as other nearby airplanes that are outfitted with the technology. An FAA requirement of all aircraft by Jan. 1, 2020, ADS-B gives the professional pilot students increased awareness by alerting them to approaching aircraft and is another component they will use in industry.

Zach Davis, Hutchinson, who graduated from Kansas State Polytechnic with a bachelor’s degree in professional pilot in May, is now a CFI for the aviation program and believes the students he is teaching are getting a well-rounded experience when flying the G36.

“An early variant of the Beechcraft Bonanza was first produced in the late 1940s, so students are getting to fly a solid aircraft with a well-established track record,” said Davis. “Beyond its prestige, the brand-new planes give students increased reliability and current technology found in the commercial and corporate world. And because the G36 is a high performance aircraft, it trains students to think ahead and make smart decisions more quickly.”

“I think the Bonanza G36 offers our students a more diverse and advanced aircraft that many other schools are not able to provide for training,” said Austin Bally, Wichita, a senior in professional pilot, captain of the campus’s flight team and a CFI. “Having G36s in our fleet introduce students to a more complicated aircraft early in their training, giving them the confidence and experience needed to fly complex aircraft in their careers.”

Along with the boost in its fleet, Kansas State Polytechnic’s aviation program will be upgrading a portion of its flight center. Textron Aviation recently donated $150,000 to modernize the Certified Flight Instructor Lab. The renovation will increase the area’s square footage, creating more workspace for flight instructors and a better learning environment for students enrolled in the program.

Kansas State Polytechnic also was recently approved as a Cessna Pilot Center, one of only five in the state of Kansas. Cessna Aircraft Company is a subsidiary of Textron Aviation Inc.

To learn more about Kansas State Polytechnic’s aviation program, including its professional pilot, airport management, aviation maintenance management, and unmanned aircraft systems bachelor’s degrees, contact admissions at 785-826-2640 or polytechnic@k-state.edu. For more information on Textron Aviation products, visit txtav.com.

Textron Aviation makes $150,000 gift to Kansas State Polytechnic

Textron Aviation is further strengthening its relationship with Kansas State University through a $150,000 donation to help the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus modernize its aviation program in the sky and on the ground.

Textron Aviation’s generosity will dramatically increase the square footage of the Certified Flight Instructor, or CFI, Lab, creating more workspace for flight instructors and a better learning environment for students enrolled in the program. This will strongly impact student recruitment at Kansas State Polytechnic and the future of the aviation industry.

The Powercat logo also will be featured on the hood of the Textron Aviation NASCAR for the race Sunday, Oct. 16, at the Kansas Speedway, another example of Textron Aviation’s continued support for the university.

“We’ve had a long relationship with K-State and we look forward to deepening our ties as the school continues training the next generation,” said Doug May, vice president of Piston Aircraft at Textron Aviation. “The modernization of the CFI Lab will not only provide a more functional learning environment and workspace, it will be instrumental in the recruitment and retention of Kansas State Polytechnic students.”

To continue reading, click HERE.