Keeping Salina Warm: Kansas State Polytechnic social work students create homelessness simulation, fundraiser for senior project

By Julee Cobb

When seven seniors in the social work degree option on the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus decided to gather warm clothing for three local agencies, they had hoped to receive 100 winter coat donations. After only 30 minutes of their seven-hour-long collection drive, the students surpassed their goal and even amassed boxes and bags filled with scarves, gloves and hats.

The fundraiser was a part of the seniors’ final project in Social Work Macro Practice and Theory, a class focused on promoting change within a community, rather than an individual. The students – Stacy Crumble, Gina Nelson-Fishel, Lexi Gasper, Hali Norris, Katrina Ramirez, Maritza Rodriguez and Tammy Trepoy – wanted to use their project to shine a light on the local homeless population and decided to create an event that would be both philanthropic and educational.

Seven seniors in the social work degree option on the Polytechnic Campus created Keeping Salina Warm – an event designed to educate the public about homelessness. The students include Stacy Crumble, Gina Nelson-Fishel, Lexi Gasper, Hali Norris, Katrina Ramirez, Maritza Rodriguez (not pictured) and Tammy Trepoy.

 

From 5 p.m. to midnight on Dec. 1, the social work students held Keeping Salina Warm, which encouraged attendees to donate winter clothing items while learning about homelessness. Participants experienced what it would be like to be without adequate shelter on a cold night through a simulation held outside the Student Life Center on campus with tents and cardboard boxes. Dinner also was served in the style of a soup kitchen and representatives of the Salina Rescue Mission, Ashby House and Domestic Violence Association of Central Kansas talked with guests about their experiences with and services for people who need help getting back on their feet.

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Kansas State Polytechnic offers training courses for social workers, other helping professionals in Salina, Manhattan and Hays

By Julee Cobb

Debra Marseline, center, social work practicum director and program coordinator at Kansas State Polytechnic, will be teaching the Working with Loss and Grief course on Oct. 13.

From self-care to working through grief, a trio of training courses for professionals in helping fields, such as social workers, therapists and psychologists, are being offered by the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus in three different Kansas cities in the coming months.

The courses, designed to provide comprehensive curriculum, including new trends in industry and refresher information, are primarily for professionals who need to obtain continuing education units, or CEUs, though anyone from the community is welcome to attend. Starting in July and running through October, Kansas State Polytechnic is holding three courses and expanding its location from only one campus in Salina to both east and west in Manhattan and Hays. The course topics include Seven Steps to Fabulous Grant Writing, Self-care is Ethical Practice, and Working with Loss and Grief. All are approved by the Kansas Behavioral Sciences Regulatory Board.

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A round of applause: Kansas State Polytechnic celebrates student achievements in annual end-of-the-year awards banquet

By Julee Cobb

The motto on the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus is, “the experience matters,” and for many Wildcats, these are words they have taken to heart.

Along with performing the typical duties of an undergrad – engaging in classroom discussion, attending study sessions and turning in homework on time – students at Kansas State Polytechnic are making vital contributions to their major, clubs and organizations, fellow students and the overall morale of the campus by enthusiastically and selflessly going beyond what is asked of them. Some students spend several extra hours a week in a learning laboratory just because they have a genuine desire to know more. Others take on the responsibility of being a voice for their peers and join student government. And for a few, it may be random acts of kindness that fulfill their time on campus.

Whatever the case may be, Kansas State Polytechnic highlights those students who make the most of their experience during the annual Awards and Recognition Banquet. Celebrating its 31st year, the dinner and awards show, held April 20, brought together students, faculty and staff to honor personal and educational accomplishments from the 2016-2017 school year.

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Kansas State Polytechnic’s Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to feature presentation on Muslims in American society

By Julee Cobb

Moussa Elbayoumy, co-founder and current board chairman of the Kansas chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, will lead a presentation on “Muslims in American Society” at the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus on April 13.

Exploring Muslim culture and its contributions to the United States will be the focus of the latest Civic Luncheon Lecture Series offered by Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus.

The presentation, “Muslims in American Society,” will feature speaker Moussa Elbayoumy at noon Thursday, April 13 in the campus’s College Center conference room. Elbayoumy is the co-founder and current board chairman of the Kansas chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations – the nation’s largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Elbayoumy will lead a discussion on the country’s current environment and how it’s impacting the Muslim community as well as notable Muslim contributions to America’s history and modern society. Gerald Gillespie, a retired professor and current member of the Spirituality Resource Center of Salina, will act as moderator.

Elbayoumy is a native of Egypt and graduated from Ain Shams University, a medical school, in Cairo in 1980. He also holds a master’s degree in healthcare administration from the University of Maryland and along with his activist role, is the president and CEO of Healthcare Innovations Consultants, Inc. Prior to starting his medical advisory practice in 2012, Elbayoumy worked for numerous hospitals, particularly in the cardiovascular arena, including serving as director of cardiology at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C.; director of the St. Francis Heart and Vascular Institute in Topeka; and vice president of heart and vascular services at Adventist Healthcare in Rockville, Maryland.

The Civic Luncheon Lecture Series is free and the public is invited. Attendees are welcome to eat during the discussion, and can bring their own lunch or purchase a lunch at the K-State Café and then bring their tray into the conference room.

Greg Stephens, an associate professor of communication and business management at Kansas State Polytechnic, created the Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to provide the campus and the community with an opportunity to learn about and participate in various current events impacting local issues. For more information on the series, contact Stephens at 785-819-6887 or gregs@k-state.edu.

Wildcat Safety Stand Down: Kansas State Polytechnic hosts aviation safety practices event March 31

WildcatSafetyStandDownBy Julee Cobb

From advice on mastering an aircraft to insight into upset recovery, the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus will be hosting an aviation seminar focused on strengthening flight safety within the industry.

Wildcat Safety Stand Down will be 4-8:30 p.m. Friday, March 31, in the College Center Conference Room at Kansas State Polytechnic and will feature presentations from four industry experts with a variety of backgrounds and proficiencies. Initiated by the campus’s nationally recognized flight team, this half-day seminar is designed for aviation professionals and general aviation enthusiasts to gain enhanced awareness and knowledge of safety practices while networking with each other and learning more about the aviation program at Kansas State Polytechnic.

“One of the flight team’s goals is to contribute to the growth and advancement of the aviation industry,” said Matthew Katzke, Waukesha, Wisconsin, a senior in professional pilot and flight team secretary/treasurer. “For many years, we have been able to share our knowledge of and enthusiasm for flying with the younger generation through summer programs, and now we want to expand our reach and connect with adults and professionals in the industry. We really hope this will be a helpful event that strengthens safety within the aviation community.”

During Wildcat Safety Stand Down, participants will experience four safety sessions covering a variety of different areas: Tom Turner, executive director of the Air Safety Foundation at the American Bonanza Society will present on mastering your aircraft; Seth Short, an aviator in the U.S. Navy and 2005 alumnus of Kansas State Polytechnic’s professional pilot program, will speak about safety culture in the military; John “Dusty” Dowd, owner of Syracuse Flying Service and an air race pilot, will discuss safety from an agricultural and air race perspective; and Troy Brockway, professor of aviation at Kansas State Polytechnic, will present on implementing a safety management system in a collegiate or training environment and upset recovery.

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Kansas State Polytechnic to highlight programs, campus clubs and student accomplishments at Open House on April 1

OpenHouseBannerFrom flight demonstrations and fleet tours to computer coding activities and 3D-printing fun, the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus will be showcasing all of its program offerings and technologies during annual Open House on April 1.

From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Kansas State Polytechnic will open its campus to the community and beyond to give visitors an inside look at academics, the facilities and student projects, clubs and achievements. Just like the campus’ “polytechnic” way of teaching and learning, many of the booths will be hands-on, encouraging attendees to participate in various activities and games. There also will be snacks, giveaways and an appearance by Willie the Wildcat. Below are examples of what guests can expect to experience at Open House:

  • Flight Team Pancake Breakfast – Start your Open House experience off right with a pancake feed from 7 to 10 a.m. courtesy of the Kansas State Polytechnic Flight Team. The meal is by donation only and there will be a drawing for two K-State football tickets with reserved parking.
  • Aviation Expo – See the aviation program’s fleet up close during a tour of the more than 30 aircraft.
  • Computer Systems Handson Experience – Check out the computer systems technology program during a basic coding activity and take photos in front of the green screen.
  • UAS Simulation and Flight – Experience a demonstration of industry-quality UAS software from our nationally recognized faculty and watch as an unmanned aircraft takes flight.
  • Build it. Print it. – Tour through our mechanical engineering technology lab and see firsthand the wonders of 3D printing.

Additionally, Open House is an opportunity for prospective students and their parents interested in enrollment to learn more about life on campus. Those curious about becoming a Wildcat can sign up for the VIP experience and receive a campus tour, attend an alumni panel and lunch, and gain insight into financial aid and scholarships. Registration is free and can be found HERE. General questions about attending Kansas State Polytechnic can be directed to the office of admissions at 785-826-2640 or polytechnic@k-state.edu.

For a listing of all of the events happening at this year’s Open House, click HERE.

 

Kansas State Polytechnic’s Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to explore First Amendment rights

By Julee Cobb

Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead a presentation on "Free Speech in Times of Crisis" at the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus on Feb. 16.

Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead a presentation on “Free Speech in Times of Crisis” at the Kansas State University Polytechnic Campus on Feb. 16.

In a time where the legitimacy of news and journalism is being challenged and freedom of speech as a whole has taken center stage in the public eye, Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus will explore the principles of the country’s First Amendment in its latest Civic Luncheon Lecture Series.

“Free Speech in Times of Crisis” will be presented at noon Thursday, Feb. 16, at Kansas State Polytechnic’s College Center conference room. Stephen Wolgast, assistant professor of journalism and digital media at Kansas State University, will lead the discussion. Bob Protzman, general manager of Rocking M Media, will act as the moderator.

The First Amendment grants U.S. citizens the right to express their opinions, including times when society is under stress. This presentation will look at the reasons free speech is protected and provide current examples of how it’s being questioned. Wolgast, who previously worked in newspaper journalism for 19 years, including nine years as an editor at The New York Times, also will cover the topics of news bias and the popularity of the term “fake news.”

“One of the jobs the press has is to hold a mirror to society,” Wolgast said. “That’s why we have to report on the failings of government and institutions, even if it upsets the powers that be. If the press can motivate people to act when things aren’t going well, then by one measure the press has succeeded.”

The Civic Luncheon Lecture Series is free and the public is invited. Attendees are welcome to eat during the discussion, and can bring their own lunch or purchase a lunch at the K-State Café and then bring their tray into the conference room.

Greg Stephens, an associate professor of communication and business management at Kansas State Polytechnic, created the Civic Luncheon Lecture Series to provide the campus and the community with an opportunity to learn about and participate in various current events impacting local issues. This presentation, in particular, is made possible in part by the Kansas Humanities Council. For more information on the series, contact Stephens at 785-819-6887 or gregs@k-state.edu.

 

Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus opens new facility dedicated to community outreach, professional development

By Julee Cobb

Kansas State Polytechnic officially opens the campus's new Outreach Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 8. From left are members of the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce All-America Team; Joe Harrison, director of facilities for Kansas State Polytechnic; Danielle Brown, director of the campus's professional education and outreach department; Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies for Kansas State Polytechnic; and another member of the All-America Team.

Kansas State Polytechnic officially opens the campus’s new Outreach Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 8. From left are members of the Salina Area Chamber of Commerce All-America Team; Joe Harrison, director of facilities for Kansas State Polytechnic; Danielle Brown, director of the campus’s professional education and outreach department; Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies for Kansas State Polytechnic; and another member of the All-America Team.

The professional education and outreach department on Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is officially home.

The Outreach Center, a new facility dedicated to the department’s community and professional development services, opened its doors Sept. 8 following a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the north corridor of the Polytechnic Campus. Built more than 50 years ago and original to the Air Force base that came before the campus property, the building has been fully renovated to include a training classroom, testing center and multiple office spaces.

“The opening of the Outreach Center marks a proud moment in the history of Kansas State Polytechnic because it demonstrates the campus’s continuous advancement toward our strategic goals of growing in both educational offerings and infrastructure,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic. “The center will provide professional education and outreach with the vital resources it needs to serve its clients and the community while acting as inspiration for the rebirth of the north section of campus.”

For years, professional education and outreach has been offering a multitude of diverse training programs, professional development resources, K-12 collaborations and civic engagement opportunities. From grade school children in summer aviation camps to Osher lifelong learning classes for people 50 and older, there are programs for a large spectrum of ages, and each offering has a broad audience reach – community members, students and industry professionals. Kansas State Polytechnic’s technology management bachelor’s degree is also offered online through the department.

“It has been the vision of professional education and outreach to provide the campus, community and our industry partners with an innovative, collaborative space where learning is accessible and inspired,” said Danielle Brown, director of the department. “The Outreach Center has exceeded our expectations and we are excited to utilize this valuable asset, especially the training classroom because it is an essential space for our programs and it holds a variety of necessary technology amenities.”

The Outreach Center was designed with multipurpose spaces, which can be adapted and easily reconfigured as programs and staff evolve over the years. Also available is office space for professional education and outreach, an additional tenant, a testing center for students and a training classroom. Significant technology upgrades were added to the classroom area, including enhanced lighting controls, high-definition cameras and microphones, flat-screen televisions, connection with any web-based meeting software and the capacity to video conference another class in a separate location.

Originally constructed in 1956 as part of Schilling Air Force Base, now home to the Polytechnic Campus, the Outreach Center has had a variety of uses over the years, including as a computer science building, student union and student activities center. Though the decision to tear it down when starting the renovation may have seemed like a logical one, Kansas State Polytechnic wanted to keep an environmental consciousness about the build.

“By repurposing this facility, Kansas State Polytechnic was able to enhance our ability to be resourceful stewards in both the fiscal and environmental realms,” said Joe Harrison, director of facilities for the campus. “By choosing to reuse in lieu of demolition, this allowed us to minimize the environmental impact by negating the need to disturb existing greenfield areas for utilities and foundations. This also enabled us to significantly reduce the amount of construction waste, which would typically have been generated and slated for a local landfill.”

The Outreach Center is in the north corridor of the campus, which is an area Kansas State Polytechnic plans on redeveloping, starting with the addition of K-State Research and Extension. Details about building renovations and a timeline are forthcoming.

For questions about the Outreach Center or to learn more about the program offerings of professional education and outreach, contact Brown at 785-826-2633 or profed@k-state.edu.

Kansas State Polytechnic UAS program offering Part 107 short course for remote pilot in command certification

By Julee Cobb

Travis Balthazor, Kansas State Polytechnic's UAS flight operations manager, prepares students for the written FAA exam during the program's Part 107 training course.

Travis Balthazor, Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS flight operations manager, prepares students for the written FAA exam during the program’s Part 107 training course.

Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus is expanding its unmanned aircraft systems program to now include a weeklong course centered on the Federal Aviation Administration’s new Part 107 regulations.

Designed to prepare professionals for remote pilot in command certification, Kansas State Polytechnic is offering a UAS commercial pilot training course from Monday, Oct. 17, through Friday, Oct. 21, focused on FAA guidelines proficiency, flight safety and development of standard operating procedures. The course was created in response to the recently instituted Part 107 rules for commercial use of small unmanned aircraft, specifically the required written FAA exam for anyone without a manned pilot certificate.

“Under the FAA’s Part 107 mandate, anyone who wants to fly for commercial operations without obtaining a manned certification must demonstrate, through a written test, the ability to safely conduct those operations; however, much of the material in the test is complex and covers topics those outside the aviation industry might not understand,” said Kurt Carraway, executive director of Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program. “We believe there is validity in offering a personalized experience where interested UAS operators can connect with our program experts and have their questions answered immediately. It is also a tremendous opportunity to answer questions about complex airspace and other subject matters that can be confusing to new aviators.”

During the first three days of the commercial pilot training course, students receive in-class instruction specifically on elements covered in the written FAA exam, such as different classes of airspace, meteorology, weather, UAS performance, loading and center of gravity, and Part 107 itself. On the fourth day, students will take the required exam in the campus’s FAA test center. The remaining day and a half is spent conducting flight training in one of the nation’s largest enclosed UAS flight facilities, which is on campus, and creating essential documents for safe operations, like standard operating procedures, a preflight checklist and flight logs. After students successfully complete the FAA exam and the course, they will receive a remote pilot in command, or RPIC, certificate from the FAA.

Spencer Schrader, a junior in the K-State Polytechnic UAS program, works with Wayne Scritchfield  of Kirkham Michael on his piloting skills.

Spencer Schrader, right, a junior in the K-State Polytechnic UAS program, works with Wayne Scritchfield of Kirkham Michael on his piloting skills.

Kansas State Polytechnic launched its first commercial pilot training course on Aug. 30, the day Part 107 went into effect. Two employees of Kirkham Michael, a civil engineering firm based in Ellsworth, with offices throughout the state and in Nebraska and Iowa, attended the five-day course in preparation of their company using UAS technology for data collection, 3-D modeling and surveying crop health.

“This UAS course has prepared us to help Kirkham Michael become the frontrunners in our industry with new technology offerings,” said Wayne Scritchfield, a registered land surveyor with the company. “Along with studying for the exam and then becoming certified, we received valuable assistance with setting up standard operating procedures and flight logs, which the FAA wants to see from professionals utilizing unmanned aircraft in their work. I had also never flown before, so it was very beneficial to have personal instruction where I could work through any learning objectives.”

All of the participants expressed that the course is a convenient way to network with other individuals and companies looking to use UAS technology for a variety of applications, which could lead to future collaborations of resources.

Wayne Scritchfield, right, and Jerry Froese, top, both of Kirkham Michael, get hands-on UAS training in K-State Polytechnic's netted flying pavilion.

Wayne Scritchfield, right, and Jerry Froese, top, both of Kirkham Michael, get hands-on UAS training in K-State Polytechnic’s netted flying pavilion.

The cost of the commercial pilot training course is $1,400 for individuals, with a discounted rate for companies sending multiple attendees. The cost of the FAA exam is an additional charge. More information on the course, including registration and travel arrangements, can be found at polytechnic.k-state.edu/profed/suas.

Kansas State Polytechnic received the country’s first Section 333 exemption for flight training in November 2015, allowing the UAS program to create and conduct an extensive flight training program for students and outside entities before the FAA-agreed upon Part 107. Along with the upcoming commercial pilot training course, Kansas State Polytechnic has been providing companies such as SkySkopes, an unmanned flight services company in North Dakota, with multirotor flight training; has been offering a UAS multirotor hobbyist course; and has implemented structured flight training curriculum for students in Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS bachelor’s degree program.

To learn more about Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS training offerings, including customizable courses, contact the campus’s professional education and outreach department at 785-826-2633 or profed@k-state.edu. To inquire about UAS research opportunities, contact Carraway at 785-826-2624 or kcarraway@k-state.edu.

 

New collaboration takes flight: Kansas State Polytechnic and Kansas Wesleyan University jointly offer unmanned aircraft systems, emergency management minors to students

By Julee Cobb and John Elmore

Kansas State University's Polytechnic Campus and Kansas Wesleyan University sign an agreement July 11 to enable unmanned aircraft systems students at Kansas State Polytechnic and emergency management students at KWU to cross-register and earn a minor in the other institution's program. Front row, from left are: Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic, and Matt Thompson, president of Kansas Wesleyan University. Back row, from left are: Bernie Botson, deputy director of emergency management for Saline County; Kendy Edmonds, junior in Kansas State Polytechnic's UAS program; Lonnie Booker, Jr., director of Kansas Wesleyan University's emergency management program; Kurt Carraway, executive director of Kansas State Polytechnic's UAS program; Bill Backlin, Kansas Wesleyan University's interim provost; and Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies at Kansas State Polytechnic.

Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus and Kansas Wesleyan University sign an agreement July 11 to enable unmanned aircraft systems students at Kansas State Polytechnic and emergency management students at KWU to cross-register and earn a minor in the other institution’s program. Front row, from left are: Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic, and Matt Thompson, president of Kansas Wesleyan University. Back row, from left are: Bernie Botson, deputy director of emergency management for Saline County; Kendy Edmonds, junior in Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program; Lonnie Booker, Jr., director of Kansas Wesleyan University’s emergency management program; Kurt Carraway, executive director of Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program; Bill Backlin, Kansas Wesleyan University’s interim provost; and Alysia Starkey, associate dean of undergraduate studies at Kansas State Polytechnic.

It’s a disaster with casualties. An emergency management team and an unmanned aircraft systems support team both arrive on scene — but how do they speak each other’s language and work together?

Two of Salina’s leading higher education institutions are joining forces to tackle that issue in a collaboration that will prepare future emergency managers how to best utilize unmanned aircraft when deploying resources and to understand and analyze the data they collect. In turn, this new collaboration will teach future UAS pilots how to efficiently operate unmanned aircraft, often known as drones, within disaster sites and support the efforts of emergency response teams in crisis situations.
The collaboration was made official at a signing event July 11 at Kansas State Polytechnic. Through this agreement, Kansas Wesleyan University emergency management majors are able to cross-register and earn a minor in unmanned aircraft systems at Kansas State University’s Polytechnic Campus, while unmanned aircraft systems students at Kansas State Polytechnic now can cross-register and earn a minor in emergency management at Kansas Wesleyan University, or KWU.

“This is the first collaboration of its kind between state and private universities for such programs,” said Matt Thompson, president and CEO of Kansas Wesleyan University. “The graduates of these nationally recognized programs will have cross-over training and knowledge that makes them more prepared and therefore, in higher demand in their career fields.”

“The origin of Kansas State Polytechnic’s UAS program was influenced by the devastating effects of the EF5 tornado in Greensburg in 2007 and the need to support first responders and emergency managers with relevant technology that locates survivors and evaluates damage,” said Verna Fitzsimmons, dean and CEO of Kansas State Polytechnic. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to reconnect with those roots through this collaboration and provide our students with another applicable avenue in the ever-expanding field of UAS.”

Dean Verna Fitzsimmons speaks during the agreement signing with Kansas Wesleyan University.

Dean Verna Fitzsimmons speaks during the agreement signing with Kansas Wesleyan University.

Students enrolled in Kansas State Polytechnic’s Bachelor of Science program in aeronautical technology with an emphasis in unmanned aircraft systems, which requires a private pilot certificate with instrument rating, will be able to add a minor in emergency management with 18 credit hours in emergency management courses taught at KWU. These hours consist of four required emergency management courses plus two emergency management electives. Required courses are Introduction to Emergency Management, Hazard Mitigation and Preparedness, Disaster Response and Recovery, and National Incident Management Systems. Emergency management elective courses include Damage Assessment, Cyberwarfare, Criminal Law, Sociology of Disaster, and Victimology.

“Many of our UAS students have ambitions of applying their operations skills in a way that is socially beneficial, and offering the emergency management minor allows them to further their career aspirations while making a contribution to those in need,” said Michael Most, Kansas State Polytechnic associate professor and unmanned aircraft systems program lead. “We also are proud to be able to share the multifaceted uses of UAS technology with KWU students to supplement and diversify their field of study by adding another tool to the emergency manager’s toolbox.”

Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in emergency management major at KWU will be able to add a minor in unmanned aircraft systems with 15 credit hours in UAS courses taught at Kansas State Polytechnic. These hours consist of three required UAS courses and two additional courses tailored for either licensed pilots or non-aviators. Required UAS courses include Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems, Processing Techniques for Low Altitude Remotely Sensed (LARS) Data, and Acquisition and Advanced Processing of LARS Data. The LARS courses are designed for environmental and agricultural sensing applications but will be tailored to the needs of KWU emergency management students for the purposes of damage assessment and remote site investigation following a disaster incident. The final two courses in the minor, UAS Design and UAS Mission Planning and Operations, will allow students to build their own unmanned aircraft capable of being remotely piloted. There is an additional cost for the aircraft materials.

“We are excited about the opportunities this new agreement presents,” said Lonnie Booker Jr., KWU assistant professor and director of emergency management. “It will take both fields of study to a whole new level of knowledge and expertise and enhance two programs that produce well-trained graduates for an emerging field.”

Guests of the signing event could view various technologies that are essential to UAS and emergency management.

Guests of the signing event could view various technologies that are essential to UAS and emergency management.

The emergency management major at Kansas Wesleyan University is the only four-year emergency management degree available in Kansas. Students gain the theoretical knowledge, practical skills and sense of duty to step in to save lives and protect property. Program tracks within the emergency management major include homeland security, business continuity and nongovernmental organizations. The major offers courses that can be taken online or on campus. KWU’s expertise in this field is gaining national attention, with Emergency Management Degree Program Guide naming the university among the “20 Top Emergency Management Bachelor’s Degree Programs Under $23,000 Average Net 2014.” Of those 20 top schools named, KWU’s degree was rated No. 8 for its quality, ahead of Arizona State University, Arkansas State University and the University of North Texas.

Booker was invited to be a panelist for the 17th annual Emergency Management Higher Education Symposium in 2015, hosted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Emergency Management Institute. His panel discussed emergency management program development and growth at colleges and universities.

Kansas Wesleyan University is located near Crisis City, operated by the Kansas Division of Emergency Management, an unrivaled world-class, multidiscipline, multiagency training environment developed to enhance the state’s capability to defend against terrorism threats and respond to disasters and emergencies. The university enjoys strong partnerships with local, regional and national emergency management experts and organizations.

Kansas State Polytechnic was the second university in the nation to offer a bachelor’s degree in unmanned aircraft systems, launched in 2009. Since that time, the program has nearly doubled its enrollment every year and to meet the demand, added a second bachelor’s degree in UAS design and integration as well as the UAS minor.

The program recently was named No. 2 on Drone Training HQ’s list of the “Top 20 Unmanned Aerial Systems Colleges in the United States” and was chosen as one of the Top 16 “Best Drone Universities” in the country by Dronethusiast.com.

The national recognition is a product of Kansas State Polytechnic’s exclusive accomplishments within the unmanned aircraft systems industry. In February 2015, Kansas State Polytechnic became the first entity in the United States to receive an FAA Certificate of Authorization for statewide access during flight operations. Recently, the program was awarded a nationwide certificate for public research operations.

In May 2015, Kansas State Polytechnic was among 20 universities across the nation, including the University of Kansas and Wichita State University, named by the U.S. Department of Transportation to an elite new group, the Federal Aviation Administration Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aircraft Systems. This alliance, called ASSURE, puts Kansas State Polytechnic at the cutting edge of UAS research in federally funded projects.

In November 2015, Kansas State Polytechnic became the first entity in the United States to receive approval from the FAA to provide UAS commercial flight training to both students and outside companies. The authorization, which is referred to as a Section 333 exemption, allowed Kansas State Polytechnic to create and conduct an extensive flight training program for unmanned aircraft operations.

And in May, it was announced that the Kansas Department of Transportation created a new position to direct UAS industry development in the state, with one of the post’s offices being located at Kansas State Polytechnic.

Kansas State Polytechnic is leading a variety of UAS research projects with outside partners, including the FAA and Westar Energy. The program has the most varied UAS fleet in U.S. academia, with a mix of more than 30 fixed-wing and rotary wing unmanned aircraft, or drones. Kansas State Polytechnic also boasts one of the largest enclosed flight facilities in the nation, allowing students to pilot their unmanned aircraft within steps of the classroom and UAS lab.

For more information on Kansas State Polytechnic’s academic UAS program, including enrollment, class options and the new emergency management minor, contact Most at 785-826-2681 or mtmost@k-state.edu. To inquire about UAS commercial flight training and research collaborations, contact Kurt Carraway, executive director of the UAS program, at 785-826-2624 or kcarraway@k-state.edu. Learn about Kansas Wesleyan University’s emergency management program by contacting Booker at lonnie.booker@kwu.edu or 785-833-4360.